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THINGS TO CONSIDER WITH REGARDS TO CONDENSING BOILERS

Condensing boilers
are very efficient at part load conditions when high supply water temperatures
are not required; however, as always, there are unique items to consider when
designing around a condensing boiler:

  • Condensing boilers require both an outside air intake flue and an exhaust flue; therefore, space for these flues must be considered. This is very important when you have multiple boilers.
  • Condensate from each boiler must be treated (neutralized) prior to dumping into floor drains. Many boiler manufacturers now offer neutralizers as a built-in optional device.  If so, spec this option.
  • Space must be considered; it is not uncommon to have many boilers side-by-side; thus, spacing of boilers and piping and flues, etc. becomes critical.
  • Service clearance areas must always be considered.
  • Each boiler’s gas load and gas pressure requirements must be coordinated with the plumbing engineer.  In addition, vents from gas trains must be routed to outdoors.
  • Close coordination between boiler manufacturer’s recommended controls and the building’s BMS must occur.
  • It is important to coordinate the sequence of operation with flow diagrams.
  • Electrical engineer must be made aware of the boiler’s electrical requirements as well as providing emergency burner shut-off controls.
  • Pulse with modulation type condensing boilers have special noise and vibration concerns that must be addressed in the design.  Carefully coordinate these types of requirements with the manufacturer’s sales representative.

Kibart Chronicle, Issue 46

Kibart’s 46th issue of the Chronicle was recently sent to clients and employees.

Click here

Highlights include Kibart’s:

  • Work on the University of Baltimore BioPark- 4 MLK Project
  • Spotlight Award
  • Go-Getters
  • New Employee
  • Family News

Kibart’s First Two LEED Certified Platinum Projects

Wake Forest Biotech Building 90 North and South

Building 90 South

Details

  • 236,000 SF
  • Core and Shell Construction Cost: $32,000,000
  • Two high efficiency 500 ton water cooled chillers with future expansion of two additional chillers.
  • Seven high efficiency pulse modulation condensing 2,000 MBG boilers with future expansion of four additional boilers.
  • Both chiller and boiler plants are variable primary.
  • Four chilled/heating water rooftop units with energy recovery wheels.
  • 1.28 GPF water closets, waterless urinals, 0.35 GPM senor lavatory faucets, & 1.25 GPM showers.
  • High Efficiency fluorescent and LED lighting, with advanced controls utilizing occupancy sensors daylight harvesting.

LEED Facts

for LEED BD+C: Core and Shell (v2009)

  • Certification awarded Jan 2014
  • Platinum - 82 (out of possible 110 points)
  • Sustainable sites - 23/28
  • Water efficiency - 8/10
  • Energy & atmosphere - 22/37
  • Material & resources - 12/13
  • Indoor environmental quality - 10/12
  • Innovation - 6/6
  • Regional priority credits - 4/4

Building 90 North

Details

  • 234,000 SF
  • Core/Shell Construction Cost: $32,000,000
  • Eight high efficiency pulse modulation condensing 2,000 MBH Boilers
  • Eleven packaged Dx/heating water rooftop units with energy recovery wheels
  • 1.28 GPF waterclosets, waterless urinals, 0.35 GPM sensor lavatory faucets, and 1.25 GPM showers.
  • High efficiency fluorescent and LED lighting, with advanced controls utilizing occupancy sensors and daylight harvesting

LEED Facts

for LEED BD+C: Core and Shell (v2009)

  • Certification awarded Jan 2014
  • Platinum - 83 (out of possible 110 points)
  • Sustainable sites - 23/28
  • Water efficiency - 8/10
  • Energy & atmosphere - 21/37
  • Material & resources - 12/13
  • Indoor environmental quality - 9/12
  • Innovation - 6/6
  • Regional priority credits - 4/4

See more photos and information on this project in our portfolio. »